notmuch: Add a new "notmuch config" command for querying configuration.
[notmuch] / notmuch.1
1 .\" notmuch - Not much of an email program, (just index, search and tagging)
2 .\"
3 .\" Copyright © 2009 Carl Worth
4 .\"
5 .\" Notmuch is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
6 .\" it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
7 .\" the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
8 .\" (at your option) any later version.
9 .\"
10 .\" Notmuch is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
11 .\" but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
12 .\" MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
13 .\" GNU General Public License for more details.
14 .\"
15 .\" You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
16 .\" along with this program.  If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/ .
17 .\"
18 .\" Author: Carl Worth <cworth@cworth.org>
19 .TH NOTMUCH 1 2009-10-31 "Notmuch 0.1"
20 .SH NAME
21 notmuch \- thread-based email index, search, and tagging
22 .SH SYNOPSIS
23 .B notmuch
24 .IR command " [" args " ...]"
25 .SH DESCRIPTION
26 Notmuch is a command-line based program for indexing, searching,
27 reading, and tagging large collections of email messages.
28
29 The quickest way to get started with Notmuch is to simply invoke the
30 .B notmuch
31 command with no arguments, which will interactively guide you through
32 the process of indexing your mail.
33 .SH NOTE
34 While the command-line program
35 .B notmuch
36 provides powerful functionality, it does not provide the most
37 convenient interface for that functionality. More sophisticated
38 interfaces are expected to be built on top of either the command-line
39 interface, or more likely, on top of the notmuch library
40 interface. See http://notmuchmail.org for more about alternate
41 interfaces to notmuch.
42 .SH COMMANDS
43 The
44 .BR setup
45 command is used to configure Notmuch for first use, (or to reconfigure
46 it later).
47 .RS 4
48 .TP 4
49 .B setup
50
51 Interactively sets up notmuch for first use.
52
53 The setup command will prompt for your full name, your primary email
54 address, any alternate email addresses you use, and the directory
55 containing your email archives. Your answers will be written to a
56 configuration file in ${NOTMUCH_CONFIG} (if set) or
57 ${HOME}/.notmuch-config . This configuration file will be created with
58 descriptive comments, making it easy to edit by hand later to change the
59 configuration. Or you can run
60 .B "notmuch setup"
61 again to change the configuration.
62
63 The mail directory you specify can contain any number of
64 sub-directories and should primarily contain only files with individual
65 email messages (eg. maildir or mh archives are perfect). If there are
66 other, non-email files (such as indexes maintained by other email
67 programs) then notmuch will do its best to detect those and ignore
68 them.
69
70 Mail storage that uses mbox format, (where one mbox file contains many
71 messages), will not work with notmuch. If that's how your mail is
72 currently stored, it is recommended you first convert it to maildir
73 format with a utility such as mb2md before running
74 .B "notmuch setup" .
75
76 Invoking
77 .B notmuch
78 with no command argument will run
79 .B setup
80 if the setup command has not previously been completed.
81 .RE
82
83 The
84 .B new
85 command is used to incorporate new mail into the notmuch database.
86 .RS 4
87 .TP 4
88 .B new
89
90 Find and import any new messages to the database.
91
92 The
93 .B new
94 command scans all sub-directories of the database, performing
95 full-text indexing on new messages that are found. Each new message
96 will automatically be tagged with both the
97 .BR inbox " and " unread
98 tags.
99
100 You should run
101 .B "notmuch new"
102 once after first running
103 .B "notmuch setup"
104 to create the initial database. The first run may take a long time if
105 you have a significant amount of mail (several hundred thousand
106 messages or more). Subsequently, you should run
107 .B "notmuch new"
108 whenever new mail is delivered and you wish to incorporate it into the
109 database. These subsequent runs will be much quicker than the initial
110 run.
111
112 Invoking
113 .B notmuch
114 with no command argument will run
115 .B new
116 if
117 .B "notmuch setup"
118 has previously been completed, but
119 .B "notmuch new"
120 has not previously been run.
121 .RE
122
123 Several of the notmuch commands accept search terms with a common
124 syntax. See the
125 .B "SEARCH SYNTAX"
126 section below for more details on the supported syntax.
127
128 The
129 .BR search ", " show " and " count
130 commands are used to query the email database.
131 .RS 4
132 .TP 4
133 .BR search " [options...] <search-term>..."
134
135 Search for messages matching the given search terms, and display as
136 results the threads containing the matched messages.
137
138 The output consists of one line per thread, giving a thread ID, the
139 date of the newest (or oldest, depending on the sort option) matched
140 message in the thread, the number of matched messages and total
141 messages in the thread, the names of all participants in the thread,
142 and the subject of the newest (or oldest) message.
143
144 Supported options for
145 .B search
146 include
147 .RS 4
148 .TP 4
149 .BR \-\-format= ( json | text )
150
151 Presents the results in either JSON or plain-text (default).
152 .RE
153 .RS 4
154 .TP 4
155 .BR \-\-sort= ( newest\-first | oldest\-first )
156
157 This option can be used to present results in either chronological order
158 .RB ( oldest\-first )
159 or reverse chronological order
160 .RB ( newest\-first ).
161
162 Note: The thread order will be distinct between these two options
163 (beyond being simply reversed). When sorting by
164 .B oldest\-first
165 the threads will be sorted by the oldest message in each thread, but
166 when sorting by
167 .B newest\-first
168 the threads will be sorted by the newest message in each thread.
169
170 .RE
171 .RS 4
172 By default, results will be displayed in reverse chronological order,
173 (that is, the newest results will be displayed first).
174
175 See the
176 .B "SEARCH SYNTAX"
177 section below for details of the supported syntax for <search-terms>.
178 .RE
179 .TP
180 .BR show " [options...] <search-term>..."
181
182 Shows all messages matching the search terms.
183
184 The messages will be grouped and sorted based on the threading (all
185 replies to a particular message will appear immediately after that
186 message in date order). The output is not indented by default, but
187 depth tags are printed so that proper indentation can be performed by
188 a post-processor (such as the emacs interface to notmuch).
189
190 Supported options for
191 .B show
192 include
193 .RS 4
194 .TP 4
195 .B \-\-entire\-thread
196
197 By default only those messages that match the search terms will be
198 displayed. With this option, all messages in the same thread as any
199 matched message will be displayed.
200 .RE
201
202 .RS 4
203 .TP 4
204 .B \-\-format=(text|json|mbox)
205
206 .RS 4
207 .TP 4
208 .B text
209
210 The default plain-text format has all text-content MIME parts
211 decoded. Various components in the output,
212 .RB ( message ", " header ", " body ", " attachment ", and MIME " part ),
213 will be delimited by easily-parsed markers. Each marker consists of a
214 Control-L character (ASCII decimal 12), the name of the marker, and
215 then either an opening or closing brace, ('{' or '}'), to either open
216 or close the component.
217
218 .RE
219 .RS 4
220 .TP 4
221 .B json
222
223 The output is formatted with Javascript Object Notation (JSON). This
224 format is more robust than the text format for automated
225 processing. JSON output always includes all messages in a matching
226 thread; in effect
227 .B \-\-format=json
228 implies
229 .B \-\-entire\-thread
230
231 .RE
232 .RS 4
233 .TP 4
234 .B mbox
235
236 All matching messages are output in the traditional, Unix mbox format
237 with each message being prefixed by a line beginning with "From " and
238 a blank line separating each message. Lines in the message content
239 beginning with "From " (preceded by zero or more '>' characters) have
240 an additional '>' character added. This reversible escaping
241 is termed "mboxrd" format and described in detail here:
242 http://homepage.ntlworld.com/jonathan.deboynepollard/FGA/mail-mbox-formats.html
243
244 .RE
245 A common use of
246 .B notmuch show
247 is to display a single thread of email messages. For this, use a
248 search term of "thread:<thread-id>" as can be seen in the first
249 column of output from the
250 .B notmuch search
251 command.
252
253 See the
254 .B "SEARCH SYNTAX"
255 section below for details of the supported syntax for <search-terms>.
256 .RE
257 .TP
258 .BR count " <search-term>..."
259
260 Count messages matching the search terms.
261
262 The number of matching messages is output to stdout.
263
264 With no search terms, a count of all messages in the database will be
265 displayed.
266 .RE
267 .RE
268
269 The
270 .B reply
271 command is useful for preparing a template for an email reply.
272 .RS 4
273 .TP 4
274 .BR reply " [options...] <search-term>..."
275
276 Constructs a reply template for a set of messages.
277
278 To make replying to email easier,
279 .B notmuch reply
280 takes an existing set of messages and constructs a suitable mail
281 template. The Reply-to header (if any, otherwise From:) is used for
282 the To: address. Vales from the To: and Cc: headers are copied, but
283 not including any of the current user's email addresses (as configured
284 in primary_mail or other_email in the .notmuch\-config file) in the
285 recipient list
286
287 It also builds a suitable new subject, including Re: at the front (if
288 not already present), and adding the message IDs of the messages being
289 replied to to the References list and setting the In\-Reply\-To: field
290 correctly.
291
292 Finally, the original contents of the emails are quoted by prefixing
293 each line with '> ' and included in the body.
294
295 The resulting message template is output to stdout.
296
297 Supported options for
298 .B reply
299 include
300 .RS
301 .TP 4
302 .BR \-\-format= ( default | headers\-only )
303 .RS
304 .TP 4
305 .BR default
306 Includes subject and quoted message body.
307 .TP
308 .BR headers\-only
309 Only produces In\-Reply\-To, References, To, Cc, and Bcc headers.
310 .RE
311
312 See the
313 .B "SEARCH SYNTAX"
314 section below for details of the supported syntax for <search-terms>.
315
316 Note: It is most common to use
317 .B "notmuch reply"
318 with a search string matching a single message, (such as
319 id:<message-id>), but it can be useful to reply to several messages at
320 once. For example, when a series of patches are sent in a single
321 thread, replying to the entire thread allows for the reply to comment
322 on issue found in multiple patches.
323 .RE
324 .RE
325
326 The
327 .B tag
328 command is the only command available for manipulating database
329 contents.
330
331 .RS 4
332 .TP 4
333 .BR tag " +<tag>|\-<tag> [...] [\-\-] <search-term>..."
334
335 Add/remove tags for all messages matching the search terms.
336
337 Tags prefixed by '+' are added while those prefixed by '\-' are
338 removed. For each message, tag removal is performed before tag
339 addition.
340
341 The beginning of <search-terms> is recognized by the first
342 argument that begins with neither '+' nor '\-'. Support for
343 an initial search term beginning with '+' or '\-' is provided
344 by allowing the user to specify a "\-\-" argument to separate
345 the tags from the search terms.
346
347 See the
348 .B "SEARCH SYNTAX"
349 section below for details of the supported syntax for <search-terms>.
350 .RE
351
352 The
353 .BR dump " and " restore
354 commands can be used to create a textual dump of email tags for backup
355 purposes, and to restore from that dump
356
357 .RS 4
358 .TP 4
359 .BR dump " [<filename>]"
360
361 Creates a plain-text dump of the tags of each message.
362
363 The output is to the given filename, if any, or to stdout.
364
365 These tags are the only data in the notmuch database that can't be
366 recreated from the messages themselves.  The output of notmuch dump is
367 therefore the only critical thing to backup (and much more friendly to
368 incremental backup than the native database files.)
369 .TP
370 .BR restore " <filename>"
371
372 Restores the tags from the given file (see
373 .BR "notmuch dump" "."
374
375 Note: The dump file format is specifically chosen to be
376 compatible with the format of files produced by sup-dump.
377 So if you've previously been using sup for mail, then the
378 .B "notmuch restore"
379 command provides you a way to import all of your tags (or labels as
380 sup calls them).
381 .RE
382
383 The
384 .B part
385 command can used to output a single part of a multi-part MIME message.
386
387 .RS 4
388 .TP 4
389 .BR part " \-\-part=<part-number> <search-term>..."
390
391 Output a single MIME part of a message.
392
393 A single decoded MIME part, with no encoding or framing, is output to
394 stdout. The search terms must match only a single message, otherwise
395 this command will fail.
396
397 The part number should match the part "id" field output by the
398 "\-\-format=json" option of "notmuch show". If the message specified by
399 the search terms does not include a part with the specified "id" there
400 will be no output.
401
402 See the
403 .B "SEARCH SYNTAX"
404 section below for details of the supported syntax for <search-terms>.
405 .RE
406
407 The
408 .B config
409 command can be used to get settings from the notmuch configuration
410 file.
411
412 .RS 4
413 .TP 4
414 .BR "config get " <section> . <item>
415
416 Get settings from the notmuch configuration file.
417
418 The value of the specified configuration item is printed to stdout. If
419 the item has multiple values, each value is separated by a newline
420 character.
421
422 Available configuration items include at least
423
424         database.path
425
426         user.name
427
428         user.primary_email
429
430         user.other_email
431
432         new.tags
433 .RE
434
435 .SH SEARCH SYNTAX
436 Several notmuch commands accept a common syntax for search terms.
437
438 The search terms can consist of free-form text (and quoted phrases)
439 which will match all messages that contain all of the given
440 terms/phrases in the body, the subject, or any of the sender or
441 recipient headers.
442
443 As a special case, a search string consisting of exactly a single
444 asterisk ("*") will match all messages.
445
446 In addition to free text, the following prefixes can be used to force
447 terms to match against specific portions of an email, (where
448 <brackets> indicate user-supplied values):
449
450         from:<name-or-address>
451
452         to:<name-or-address>
453
454         subject:<word-or-quoted-phrase>
455
456         attachment:<word>
457
458         tag:<tag> (or is:<tag>)
459
460         id:<message-id>
461
462         thread:<thread-id>
463
464 The
465 .B from:
466 prefix is used to match the name or address of the sender of an email
467 message.
468
469 The
470 .B to:
471 prefix is used to match the names or addresses of any recipient of an
472 email message, (whether To, Cc, or Bcc).
473
474 Any term prefixed with
475 .B subject:
476 will match only text from the subject of an email. Searching for a
477 phrase in the subject is supported by including quotation marks around
478 the phrase, immediately following
479 .BR subject: .
480
481 The
482 .B attachment:
483 prefix can be used to search for specific filenames (or extensions) of
484 attachments to email messages.
485
486 For
487 .BR tag: " and " is:
488 valid tag values include
489 .BR inbox " and " unread
490 by default for new messages added by
491 .B notmuch new
492 as well as any other tag values added manually with
493 .BR "notmuch tag" .
494
495 For
496 .BR id: ,
497 message ID values are the literal contents of the Message\-ID: header
498 of email messages, but without the '<', '>' delimiters.
499
500 The
501 .B thread:
502 prefix can be used with the thread ID values that are generated
503 internally by notmuch (and do not appear in email messages). These
504 thread ID values can be seen in the first column of output from
505 .B "notmuch search"
506
507 In addition to individual terms, multiple terms can be
508 combined with Boolean operators (
509 .BR and ", " or ", " not
510 , etc.). Each term in the query will be implicitly connected by a
511 logical AND if no explicit operator is provided, (except that terms
512 with a common prefix will be implicitly combined with OR until we get
513 Xapian defect #402 fixed).
514
515 Parentheses can also be used to control the combination of the Boolean
516 operators, but will have to be protected from interpretation by the
517 shell, (such as by putting quotation marks around any parenthesized
518 expression).
519
520 Finally, results can be restricted to only messages within a
521 particular time range, (based on the Date: header) with a syntax of:
522
523         <intial-timestamp>..<final-timestamp>
524
525 Each timestamp is a number representing the number of seconds since
526 1970\-01\-01 00:00:00 UTC. This is not the most convenient means of
527 expressing date ranges, but until notmuch is fixed to accept a more
528 convenient form, one can use the date program to construct
529 timestamps. For example, with the bash shell the folowing syntax would
530 specify a date range to return messages from 2009\-10\-01 until the
531 current time:
532
533         $(date +%s \-d 2009\-10\-01)..$(date +%s)
534 .SH ENVIRONMENT
535 The following environment variables can be used to control the
536 behavior of notmuch.
537 .TP
538 .B NOTMUCH_CONFIG
539 Specifies the location of the notmuch configuration file. Notmuch will
540 use ${HOME}/.notmuch\-config if this variable is not set.
541 .SH SEE ALSO
542 The emacs-based interface to notmuch (available as
543 .B notmuch.el
544 in the Notmuch distribution).
545
546 The notmuch website:
547 .B http://notmuchmail.org
548 .SH CONTACT
549 Feel free to send questions, comments, or kudos to the notmuch mailing
550 list <notmuch@notmuchmail.org> . Subscription is not required before
551 posting, but is available from the notmuchmail.org website.
552
553 Real-time interaction with the Notmuch community is available via IRC
554 (server: irc.freenode.net, channel: #notmuch).