test: copyright information updates
[notmuch] / test / README
1 Notmuch test suite
2 ==================
3 This directory contains the test suite for notmuch.
4
5 When fixing bugs or enhancing notmuch, you are strongly encouraged to
6 add tests in this directory to cover what you are trying to fix or
7 enhance.
8
9 Prerequisites
10 -------------
11 The test system itself requires:
12
13   - bash(1) version 4.0 or newer
14
15 Without bash 4.0+ the tests just refuse to run.
16
17 Some tests require external dependencies to run. Without them, they
18 will be skipped, or (rarely) marked failed. Please install these, so
19 that you know if you break anything.
20
21   - GNU tar(1)
22   - dtach(1)
23   - emacs(1)
24   - emacsclient(1)
25   - gdb(1)
26   - gpg(1)
27   - python(1)
28
29 If your system lacks these tools or have older, non-upgreable versions
30 of these, please (possibly compile and) install these to some other
31 path, for example /usr/local/bin or /opt/gnu/bin. Then prepend the
32 chosen directory to your PATH before running the tests.
33
34 e.g. env PATH=/opt/gnu/bin:$PATH make test
35
36 Running Tests
37 -------------
38 The easiest way to run tests is to say "make test", (or simply run the
39 notmuch-test script). Either command will run all available tests.
40
41 Alternately, you can run a specific subset of tests by simply invoking
42 one of the executable scripts in this directory, (such as ./T*-search.sh,
43 ./T*-reply.sh, etc). Note that you will probably want "make test-binaries"
44 before running individual tests.
45
46 The following command-line options are available when running tests:
47
48 --debug::
49         This may help the person who is developing a new test.
50         It causes the command defined with test_debug to run.
51
52 --immediate::
53         This causes the test to immediately exit upon the first
54         failed test.
55
56 --valgrind::
57         Execute notmuch with valgrind and exit with status
58         126 on errors (just like regular tests, this will only stop
59         the test script when running under -i).  Valgrind errors
60         go to stderr, so you might want to pass the -v option, too.
61
62         Since it makes no sense to run the tests with --valgrind and
63         not see any output, this option implies --verbose.  For
64         convenience, it also implies --tee.
65
66 --tee::
67         In addition to printing the test output to the terminal,
68         write it to files named 't/test-results/$TEST_NAME.out'.
69         As the names depend on the tests' file names, it is safe to
70         run the tests with this option in parallel.
71
72 --root=<dir>::
73         This runs the testsuites specified under a separate directory.
74         However, caution is advised, as not all tests are maintained
75         with this relocation in mind, so some tests may behave
76         differently.
77
78         Pointing this argument at a tmpfs filesystem can improve the
79         speed of the test suite for some users.
80
81 Certain tests require precomputed databases to complete. You can fetch these
82 databases with
83
84         make download-test-databases
85
86 If you do not download the test databases, the relevant tests will be
87 skipped.
88
89 When invoking the test suite via "make test" any of the above options
90 can be specified as follows:
91
92         make test OPTIONS="--verbose"
93
94 You can choose an emacs binary (and corresponding emacsclient) to run
95 the tests in one of the following ways.
96
97         TEST_EMACS=my-emacs TEST_EMACSCLIENT=my-emacsclient make test
98         TEST_EMACS=my-emacs TEST_EMACSCLIENT=my-emacsclient ./T*-emacs.sh
99         make test TEST_EMACS=my-emacs TEST_EMACSCLIENT=my-emacsclient
100
101 Some tests may require a c compiler. You can choose the name and flags similarly
102 to with emacs, e.g.
103
104      make test TEST_CC=gcc TEST_CFLAGS="-g -O2"
105
106 Quiet Execution
107 ---------------
108
109 Normally, when new script starts and when test PASSes you get a message
110 printed on screen. This printing can be disabled by setting the
111 NOTMUCH_TEST_QUIET variable to a non-null value. Message on test
112 failures and skips are still printed.
113
114 Skipping Tests
115 --------------
116 If, for any reason, you need to skip one or more tests, you can do so
117 by setting the NOTMUCH_SKIP_TESTS variable to the name of one or more
118 sections of tests.
119
120 For example:
121
122     $ NOTMUCH_SKIP_TESTS="search reply" make test
123
124 Even more fine-grained skipping is possible by appending a test number
125 (or glob pattern) after the section name. For example, the first
126 search test and the second reply test could be skipped with:
127
128     $ NOTMUCH_SKIP_TESTS="search.1 reply.2" make test
129
130 Note that some tests in the existing test suite rely on previous test
131 items, so you cannot arbitrarily skip any test and expect the
132 remaining tests to be unaffected.
133
134 Currently we do not consider skipped tests as build failures. For
135 maximum robustness, when setting up automated build processes, you
136 should explicitely skip tests, rather than relying on notmuch's
137 detection of missing prerequisites. In the future we may treat tests
138 unable to run because of missing prerequisites, but not explicitely
139 skipped by the user, as failures.
140
141 Writing Tests
142 -------------
143 The test script is written as a shell script. It is to be named as
144 Tddd-testname.sh where 'ddd' is three digits and 'testname' the "bare"
145 name of your test. Tests will be run in order the 'ddd' part determines.
146
147 The test script should start with the standard "#!/usr/bin/env bash"
148 and an assignment to variable 'test_description', like this:
149
150         #!/usr/bin/env bash
151
152         test_description='xxx test (option --frotz)
153
154         This test exercises the "notmuch xxx" command when
155         given the option --frotz.'
156
157 Source 'test-lib.sh'
158 --------------------
159 After assigning test_description, the test script should source
160 test-lib.sh like this:
161
162         . ./test-lib.sh || exit 1
163
164 This test harness library does the following things:
165
166  - If the script is invoked with command line argument --help
167    (or -h), it shows the test_description and exits.
168
169  - Creates a temporary directory with default notmuch-config and a
170    mail store with a corpus of mail, (initially, 50 early messages
171    sent to the notmuch list). This directory is
172    test/tmp.<test-basename>. The path to notmuch-config is exported in
173    NOTMUCH_CONFIG environment variable and mail store path is stored
174    in MAIL_DIR variable.
175
176  - Defines standard test helper functions for your scripts to
177    use.  These functions are designed to make all scripts behave
178    consistently when command line arguments --verbose (or -v),
179    --debug (or -d), and --immediate (or -i) is given.
180
181 End with test_done
182 ------------------
183 Your script will be a sequence of tests, using helper functions
184 from the test harness library.  At the end of the script, call
185 'test_done'.
186
187 Test harness library
188 --------------------
189 There are a handful helper functions defined in the test harness
190 library for your script to use.
191
192  test_expect_success <message> <script>
193
194    This takes two strings as parameter, and evaluates the
195    <script>.  If it yields success, test is considered
196    successful.  <message> should state what it is testing.
197
198  test_begin_subtest <message>
199
200    Set the test description message for a subsequent test_expect_equal
201    invocation (see below).
202
203  test_subtest_known_broken
204
205    Mark the current test as broken.  Such tests are expected to fail.
206    Unlike the normal tests, which say "PASS" on success and "FAIL" on
207    failure, these will say "FIXED" on success and "BROKEN" on failure.
208    Failures from these tests won't cause -i (immediate) to stop.  A
209    test must call this before any test_expect_* function.
210
211  test_expect_equal <output> <expected>
212
213    This is an often-used convenience function built on top of
214    test_expect_success. It uses the message from the last
215    test_begin_subtest call, so call before calling
216    test_expect_equal. This function generates a successful test if
217    both the <output> and <expected> strings are identical. If not, it
218    will generate a failure and print the difference of the two
219    strings.
220
221  test_expect_equal_file <file1> <file2>
222
223    Identical to test_expect_equal, except that <file1> and <file2>
224    are files instead of strings.  This is a much more robust method to
225    compare formatted textual information, since it also notices
226    whitespace and closing newline differences.
227
228  test_expect_equal_json <output> <expected>
229
230    Identical to test_expect_equal, except that the two strings are
231    treated as JSON and canonicalized before equality testing.  This is
232    useful to abstract away from whitespace differences in the expected
233    output and that generated by running a notmuch command.
234
235  test_debug <script>
236
237    This takes a single argument, <script>, and evaluates it only
238    when the test script is started with --debug command line
239    argument.  This is primarily meant for use during the
240    development of a new test script.
241
242  test_emacs <emacs-lisp-expressions>
243
244    This function executes the provided emacs lisp script within
245    emacs. The script can be a sequence of emacs lisp expressions,
246    (that is, they will be evaluated within a progn form). Emacs
247    stdout and stderr is not available, the common way to get output
248    is to save it to a file. There are some auxiliary functions
249    useful in emacs tests provided in test-lib.el. Do not use `setq'
250    for setting variables in Emacs tests because it affects other
251    tests that may run in the same Emacs instance.  Use `let' instead
252    so the scope of the changed variables is limited to a single test.
253
254  test_emacs_expect_t <emacs-lisp-expressions>
255
256   This function executes the provided emacs lisp script within
257   emacs in a manner similar to 'test_emacs'. The expressions should
258   return the value `t' to indicate that the test has passed. If the
259   test does not return `t' then it is considered failed and all data
260   returned by the test is reported to the tester.
261
262  test_done
263
264    Your test script must have test_done at the end.  Its purpose
265    is to summarize successes and failures in the test script and
266    exit with an appropriate error code.
267
268 There are also a number of notmuch-specific auxiliary functions and
269 variables which are useful in writing tests:
270
271   generate_message
272
273     Generates a message with an optional template. Most tests will
274     actually prefer to call add_message. See below.
275
276   add_message
277
278     Generate a message and add it to the database (by calling "notmuch
279     new"). It is sufficient to simply call add_message with no
280     arguments if you don't care about the content of the message. If
281     more control is needed, arguments can be provide to specify many
282     different header values for the new message. See the documentation
283     within test-lib.sh or refer to many example calls within existing
284     tests.
285
286   add_email_corpus
287
288     This function should be called at the beginning of a test file
289     when a test needs to operate on a non-empty body of messages. It
290     will initialize the mail database to a known state of 50 sample
291     messages, (culled from the early history of the notmuch mailing
292     list).
293
294   notmuch_counter_reset
295   $notmuch_counter_command
296   notmuch_counter_value
297
298     These allow to count how many times notmuch binary is called.
299     notmuch_counter_reset() function generates a script that counts
300     how many times it is called and resets the counter to zero.  The
301     function sets $notmuch_counter_command variable to the path to the
302     generated script that should be called instead of notmuch to do
303     the counting.  The notmuch_counter_value() function prints the
304     current counter value.
305
306 There are also functions which remove various environment-dependent
307 values from notmuch output; these are useful to ensure that test
308 results remain consistent across different machines.
309
310  notmuch_search_sanitize
311  notmuch_show_sanitize
312  notmuch_show_sanitize_all
313  notmuch_json_show_sanitize
314
315    All these functions should receive the text to be sanitized as the
316    input of a pipe, e.g.
317    output=`notmuch search "..." | notmuch_search_sanitize`